Child Well-Being Grant Program

Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

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Grant amount: US $100,000 - US $10,000,000

Deadline: Rolling

Applicant type: Nonprofit

Funding uses: Project / Program

Location of project: United States

Location of residency: United States

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About this funder:

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Overview:

NOTE: Although unsolicited proposals are rarely considered, inquiries about future support for projects that fall within the Child Well-being Program’s grant-making strategies can be submitted through a letter of inquiry.

Mission

The mission of the Child Well-being Program is to promote children’s healthy development and protect them from abuse and neglect.

About Doris Duke and Child Well-being

Doris Duke took a special interest in the needs of children, supporting nearly 85 child welfare organizations during her life. In her will, Doris Duke expressed her interest in "the prevention of cruelty to children."

Goals

Children’s well-being and ability to thrive are strongly tied to the safety and stability of both their families and the communities where they live. These factors provide the foundation for healthy physical and emotional development during childhood. All children should be able to grow up in secure, positive, healthy and inclusive environments that allow them to reach their full potential. Unfortunately, many children in the US experience a long legacy of unjust historic and systemic inequities and disparities that rob them of access to the fundamental factors that allow others to flourish. By funding efforts that strengthen the social service systems that serve these families and support the needs of children and caregivers together, the Child Well-being Program aims to promote children’s healthy development, prevent maltreatment, and ally with communities to create improved and more equitable outcomes for their children. 

To accomplish this goal, the program focuses its grant making in three areas: 

Support Place-Based Approaches to Improving Well-being

Strengthen and Coordinate Service Systems

Build a Pipeline of Diverse Social Service Leaders

Strategies

The Child Well-being Program’s grant-making strategy is designed to foster the long-term well-being of children, families, and communities by funding efforts to protect and improve the health and positive development of populations experiencing disproportional historic and systemic inequities in the US. We have a particular interest in supporting work that bolsters collaborative and culturally, geographically and locally relevant programs with and for families; for Native American or Alaska Native communities; and for youth in or transitioning out of foster care.  

  • Cultivate partnerships between organizations and systems that serve children and families to increase health equity and well-being.
  • Coordinate efforts across a variety of social service systems.
  • Implement interventions that meet the needs of children and families in their neighborhoods and communities.
  • Increase access to prevention and treatment services.
  • Communicate lessons and outcomes broadly to inform policy and practice.
  • Invest in developing and supporting the next generation of leaders committed to implementing effective programs and policies serving children and families.

You can learn more about this opportunity by visiting the funder's website.

Eligibility:

  • All Doris Duke Charitable Foundation programs require that grantee organizations be 501(c)(3) tax-exempt entities based in the United States.
    • Only letters of inquiry submitted by U.S. nonprofit organizations will be reviewed.
  • In addition to the program’s prevention and early intervention goals and strategies, the program uses the following criteria to guide its grant-making decisions:
    • Innovative Approaches to Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect
      • The foundation is particularly interested in new methods and models that involve larger community-based efforts to improve overall conditions for families with young children, particularly those at high risk for abuse and neglect.
    • Youngest Children (ages 0 to 6)
      • Organizations supported by the foundation must reach families with children from birth to six years old, a group that constitutes the majority of child abuse and neglect cases and suffers the greatest consequences of maltreatment.
    • Potentially Replicable
      • To harness the promise of evidence-based programs that reduce rates of child abuse and neglect, the foundation prioritizes support for initiatives that have the potential to be replicated throughout the country and present compelling data and evidence of measurable improvements in child and/or family outcomes.

Preferences:

  • The Child Well-being Program prioritizes funding for projects and programs that:
    • Cultivate partnerships between organizations and systems that serve vulnerable children and families.
    • Coordinate efforts across a variety of social service systems.
    • Implement interventions that meet the needs of vulnerable children and families in their neighborhoods and communities.
    • Increase access to prevention and treatment services.
    • Communicate lessons and outcomes broadly to inform policy and practice.
    • Invest in developing and supporting the next generation of leaders committed to implementing effective programs and policies serving vulnerable children and families.

Ineligibility:

  • At this time, the foundation does not directly support: 
    • treatment programs or trauma services for victims;
    • projects focused solely on childhood sexual abuse;
    • prevention of bullying in schools;
    • self-protection or conflict resolution programs for children; or programs related to protecting children from internet predators.
  • The foundation does not support individual requests for legal help or counseling to resolve individual family problems.